Dun Whinny Trophies

The members of Dun Whinny compete for more than 20 separate trophies every year. Some date back to the early years of the club whilst others have been added later, often donated by members once their playing days are over.

The following narrative history of each trophy has been kindly provided by Ron MacKelvie who was the club Secretary from 1986 until 2015 and is now an honorary life member of the club.

The Championship Cup – first played in 1936

This is the original trophy of the Club and presented to Dun Whinny by John C Dougal one of the instigators and founders of the Club. The cup is a beautiful trophy on a stem supported by three silver golf clubs and mounted on a plinth with silver bands recording the names of all the winners. The Trophy was initially presented for stroke play competition in the Spring Meeting of 1936. At the AGM in 1937 it was decided that this trophy should be named the “Club Championship Trophy” and would be awarded to the player with the aggregate of the two best net scores in the Spring, Summer and Autumn meetings. The qualification conditions for this trophy have never been changed since that date. The first winner of the trophy was Dennis Blanc who scored 72-1 = 71

 

Championship Cup

Championship Cup

 

The Scratch Trophy – first played in 1959

The Scratch Trophy was presented to Dun Whinny in 1959 by the then Captain J S Paterson, the one-time District Valuer for Stirling Council and himself a keen middle handicap golfer.

Jack Paterson felt that while there was a knockout competition for handicap golfers there was not a trophy for a scratch knockout competition the winner of which might fairly be described as the Club Champion. The Trophy has been played for each year since 1959 and during this time it has been won by the same person on a number of occasions – Ronnie Robertson and David Donaldson each having won it five times. Only two people have won this trophy more times – J L White and K J Smith have both won it 6 times.

J L White (Lorne) was one of the founder members of Dun Whinny and was a golfer of some note. His handicap at the time of joining was 7 and he remained a significant competitor all his life. He was the owner of a weaving mill in Auchterarder called Whites Mill in Abbey Road. As one of the original members of Dun Whinny Lorne presented a prize each year from 1936 until 1985. The original prizes were quite unique by comparison with prizes today and, for instance, in the early years Lorne presented a suit of silk pyjamas to the winner of his prize. He was one of the old style Dun Whinny members and something of an eccentric. He never carried a full bag of Clubs preferring always to play with a half set. In keeping with his character he used the even numbered irons to play the Queens course and the odd numbered irons to play the Kings course.

His golf bag was unique being constructed from Harris tweed and finished with leather bindings with a ball pocket big enough for no more than three balls. When queried about this he maintained if you need more than three balls you shouldn’t be on the golf course! The bag had no pocket for waterproofs as he never played in the rain but it did have a long narrow pocket sewn down one side of the bag which allowed him to carry the Clubs on his right shoulder with heads facing backwards and his hand would then slip down this side pocket to keep warm on cold days. Certainly one of the simplest and most effective golf bags. To Lorne can also be attributed the invention of the long putter. Many years before these came on the scene Lorne appeared with a putter with a second shaft driven into the top of the main shaft giving a putter length of probably about 60 inches and with this he putted very effectively. Lorne had a supreme ability to get up and down in 2 from almost anywhere near the green. If you played with Lorne and queried a pin placement on any of the greens Lorne would simply state that the “centre of the green never moves” and promptly placed his shot in the middle and was therefore rarely too far from the hole.

Scratch Trophy

Scratch Trophy

The Hally Prize – first started in 1960

J A Hally, one of the original members of the Club in 1936, donated a prize each year for Stableford competition over the Kings course from the medal tees. The actual date of commencement is not entirely clear but certainty from 1960 onwards this prize has been in existence and continues to this day being supported firstly by his son Mike Hally and now by his grandson Richard Hally. The prize takes the form of a gift rather than a trophy.

The Singles Handicap Knockout Trophy – presented in 1961

This trophy was presented to the Club by John C Dougall one of the original members of the Club. There had been a singles knockout competition in the Club since its inception in 1936 but the prize initially for the winner was a golfing jacket and the runner up received a pipe. From about 1940 onwards the prize for the knockout competition became a money voucher initially of one guinea and never getting higher than two guineas in 1961. Thereafter the trophy became the main prize though for some time the winners also received a prize voucher along with the trophy.

The first winner of the trophy was Dick Storey a popular member of the Club who became Captain in 1966.

Singles Knock out

Singles Knock out

 

 

 

The J D Penny Quaich – first played in 1968

This is a silver Quaich first played for in 1968. The competition is for foursomes golf. There is no note in the Club minutes of how this trophy came into being but it is likely that it was purchased by the Club and named in the honour of the then Honorary Secretary, James D Penny. For this event members are allowed to nominate their own partner but after a number of years when the same pairing kept winning the trophy the rule was changed so that any pairing may now defend the trophy only once.

J D Penny Quaich

J D Penny Quaich

 

The Muirfield Salver – first awarded in 1969

The Club for many years had an annual outing to Muirfield which started in 1961 at the suggestion of the Captain Dr. Robert Dick and the Muirfield Salver was later presented to the Club by the then Vice Captain W B G Mitchell in 1969.

The first winner of the trophy was W R M Hally (Mike). The trophy is very unusual as it is more of a tray than a salver and is of African origin made from African coinage beaten together in such a way as to form a tray. There is an African inscription on the back of the tray along with the winner’s names. The salver was presented to the winner of competition played over that course usually in medal format but later Stableford format was introduced. The annual outing to Muirfield ceased after 2009, some 48 years after it started, the trophy is now played for over differing venues.

Muirfield Salver

Muirfield Salver

 

The Duncrub Trophy – first played in 1976

In 1976 Lord Rollo expressed a wish to provide a trophy to the Club for scratch competition. The Council decided that as there was already trophy for handicap competition (the Championship Cup) this trophy should be awarded for the two best scratch scores in the Spring, Summer and Autumn meetings each year. The trophy is an unusual silver plated inkstand decorated with crossed golf clubs and two silver balls as ink wells and the whole supported on three small silver balls. The names initially were inscribed on the inkstand but when no space was left an attractive hardwood stand was made on which the trophy is mounted. Lord Rollo was one of Dun Whinny’s many characters and in his later years only played golf if he could be first off the tee in the morning and played mostly with Ian Donaldson. The first winner of this trophy was R M Robertson.

Duncrub Trophy

Duncrub Trophy

 

Donaldson Salver – first played in 1976

At the AGM in 1976 it was announced that Alastair Donaldson, previously a Director of Donaldson Knitwear in Alloa, had presented Dun Whinny with a solid silver salver to be awarded annually to the member who recorded the best net score in any Medal Competition on either the Kings or Queens course at Gleneagles. The names are inscribed on the underside of the tray together with the course and score. It forms a wonderful record over many years of both member names and scores.

Donaldson Salver

Donaldson Salver

 

The Gordon Lockhart Trophy – first played in 1978

This trophy which is a beautiful silver rose bowl was donated to the Club in 1978 by the son of Gordon Lockhart who was the very first professional at Gleneagles. The trophy is one which Gordon Lockhart himself won in competition in 1912 at Turnberry and this fact is inscribed on the trophy. Gordon Lockhart had moved to Australia and the cup had been among Gordon Lockhart’s possessions when he died. His son thought it would be appropriate for the trophy to be donated to Dun Whinny and played for in competition decided by the Council. It was agreed that the cup should be awarded for a 36-hole competition played on the one day (a Wednesday) and while it was recognized than that not all members would wish to play two rounds on the one day entries would be accepted from those who wished to play a single round and participate in a lunch organised between rounds for all players.

Gordon Lockhart

Gordon Lockhart

 

The President’s Platter – first awarded in 1978

In 1978 the minutes record the Secretary having received a call from J C Dougall the founding Captain of Dun Whinny enquiring whether he should consider resigning due to his increasing age. Council considered that in view of his being the original Founder Captain and also for his staunch support and generosity that he should be appointed the first Honorary President of Dun Whinny. This was a gesture which was much appreciated by Mr. Dougall who then presented a silver platter for competition to be called the Presidents Platter and the decision was that the competition be the best aggregate of net score over one round of the Kings and one round of the Queens courses played from the forward tees. It is worth noting that J C Dougall presented three trophies to the Club including the original Championship Cup in 1936.

Presidents Platter

Presidents Platter

 

James D Penny Shield – first played in 1981

In 1980 the Club Minutes report that communication had been made with Mrs. Penny regarding the type of competition which should be instigated as a memorial to the late James D Penny who had been the Secretary of Dun Whinny for some 40+ years and who died in 1977.

The trophy is awarded for the best net score from the front tees of the Queens course. At this time the Club was in contact with Churchill Park Golf Club in Melbourne, Australia with a view to arranging hospitality and golf with a party of their members on a visit to Gleneagles in 1981. Historically Dun Whinny had played an annual match with Churchill Park with teams drawn and a Stableford match played on the same day in each country and the results were then telexed back and forth between the Clubs. In 1981 a party of 30 members of Churchill Park accompanied by 25 wives visited Gleneagles and the match for the first time was held head to head. During this visit Dun Whinny was presented with a new trophy which was then named the James D Penny Memorial Trophy and this was accepted on behalf of the Club by Gillian Penny – James Penny’s daughter. The trophy itself is sheet of beaten copper depicting the Churchill Park Club badge and is mounted in a hardwood frame and is designed to be hung on a wall. The trophy has some historical significance to Dun Whinny but is one which members have said they have difficulty in accommodating due to its size.

James D Penny Shield

James D Penny Shield

 

The Stroke Play Trophy – first awarded in 1984

In late 1983 there was some discussion at Council about changing the format of the Championship Cup (the original trophy of the Club) but it is clear from the minutes that this idea was not welcome and the result of the discussion at that time was the purchase of a new trophy by the Club to be called the Stroke Play Trophy. It was decided this would be a four round medal play trophy. For many years the trophy was played utilising medals on four consecutive months, two on the Kings and Two on the Queens. The best net aggregate was declared the winner. In recent years with the construction of the PGA Centenary Golf course the format of this has now been changed to three medal rounds one Kings, one Queens and one PGA. Again the winner is the member with the best net aggregate for the three rounds.

Stroke Play Cup

Stroke Play Cup

 

The Captains Prize – first awarded in 1984

The current trophy, first played for in 1984, is a brass eagle mounted on a wooden plinth. This was presented by Ian Bayne the Captain of Dun Whinny from 1983 to 1985. The format varies but was originally declared to be a Stableford competition with full handicap from the yellow tees of the Queens course. The trophy was usually accompanied by some small token or gift from the Captain. The Captains prize as such has been in existence in the Club since at least 1949 but it was usually a gift such as a pewter tankard purchased by the Captain at that time.

Captains Prize

Captains Prize

 

The D F Darroch Trophy – first awarded in 1985

D F Darroch was the Honorary Secretary of Dun Whinny for some eight years and had been Captain and on Council for many years prior to his resignation in 1986. During this time listed among the prizes was the Stuart Drysdale Prize. Stuart was a long standing member of Dun Whinny and had presented a prize for the best Stableford score from medal tees over the Queens Course which was a very popular event. He was forced to resign due to continuing eyesight problems and Fraser Darroch agreed to donate a trophy to maintain the continuity of this event and also as a gesture when he retired as Secretary at the 1986 AGM.

D F Darroch Trophy

D F Darroch Trophy

 

The Princes Pot Trophy – first awarded in 1986

Before the development of the PGA Centenary golf course Dun Whinny played some medals on the Glendevon Course and it was at the suggestion of John Rankin that at least two of the medals on the Glendevon course be moved to the Princes Course and he purchased a small trophy to be awarded to the best two round Stableford aggregate on the Princes Course. At that time the princes Course was 18 holes in length which then became known as the Wee Course and now known as the PGA Academy Course and is only 9 holes of Par 3 golf. The change came about when a substantial portion of the Princes Course was lost to the formation of what is now the PGA Centenary Course. In 1999 following approval from John Rankin the Princes Pot is now played as two rounds of Stableford Golf on the PGA Centenary Course.

Princes Pot

Princes Pot

 

The Jubilee Trophy – first awarded in 1986

At a Council Meeting in January 1986 Peter Miller, the Captain at that time, drew attention to the fact that 1986 would be the 50th anniversary of the founding of Dun Whinny Golf Club and proposed that by way of celebration this should be marked by a special competition followed by an informal dance in the Dormy House. The initial proposal was for a member and guest two ball green-some Stableford event. The final format was agreed to be a two ball better ball event played from the medal tees – a format which is retained to this day. A Trophy was purchased to be presented each year at the annual dance. In the early years of this competition the evening function took the form of a buffet supper dance held in the Dormy House to which the wives/partners were invited. The event now forms the popular Member/Guest Invitation day and has more recently been held over the PGA Centenary Course as a shotgun event followed by a dinner.

Jubilee Trophy

Jubilee Trophy

 

Secretary’s Salvers – first awarded in 1993

At a Council Meeting in March 1983 the Secretary put forward a proposal for a Mixed Foursome knock-out competition with pairings being drawn from Dun Whinny and Dunbracken. Ron MacKelvie, Secretary, indicated that he along with his wife, Aileen, currently the Secretary of Dunbracken would present a trophy for this competition in the form of a pair of silver plated salvers to be called the Secretary’s Salvers. The competition was to be played over the Queens course. Strokes were to be taken from the gent’s card and ladies were to drive on the odd numbered holes.

Secretary's Salvers

Secretary’s Salvers

 

The Jack Adams (Jnr) Stableford Trophy – first awarded in 1996

Jack Adams had been a member of Dun Whinny for a number of years and was a larger than life American whose home town was Carmel in California. Jack was a retired Vice President of the Crocker Bank and looked after many prestigious golfing clients in Carmel. He purchased property at Gleneagles and for many years he spent the summer months here and the winter months in Carmel. He became a popular member of the Dun Whinny and his wife Willene, also a keen golfer, was at one time the Captain of the Dunbracken Ladies.

In the mid 1990’s Jack became unwell and decided that he would have to settle and remain in California and he expressed a wish to donate a trophy to Dun Whinny to reflect the years of enjoyment he had as a member. The trophy is a simple hardwood base on which is mounted a sliver plate with the winner’s names and on top which is placed a glass molding of a golfer. Jack became known as “the big American” – he was over 6’0” tall and weighed conservatively more than 20 stone. Both he and his wife had great sense of humor and were very generous with their hospitality.

Jack Adams Trophy

Jack Adams Trophy

 

The Peter Miller Trophy – first awarded in 1996

Peter Miller was a long standing member of Dun Whinny who served on Council and was Captain of the Club from 1984 to 1986. He died suddenly in 1993. His son Stuart Miller remains a member of the Club. Peter was born with a deformed left arm which nevertheless did not stop him from playing golf very effectively. There was not much that ever stopped Peter but he did need help with tying the laces of his golf shoes which I can remember doing on a number of occasions. At a meeting of Council in 1996 Richard Hally advised he had discussions with Stuart Miller regarding the offer of a prize in Memory of Peter for competition on the Queens Course. Peter particularly enjoyed playing the Queens course and specifically enjoyed the Five Club competition so it was felt appropriate that the trophy being donated should be awarded for that event.

Peter Miller Trophy

Peter Miller Trophy

 

The James Braid Trophy – first awarded in 2000

In the Minutes of May 2000 it is noted that a trophy had been offered to the Club by W S Baxter, one of the members. Council were asked to consider acceptance of same and the form of competition for which it should be awarded. After some discussion it was agreed that the trophy, a splendid antique silver trophy, should be awarded as an Order of Merit Trophy. Points would be awarded to the first 20 competitors in all competitions except Extra Medals the winner being the member who accumulated the most points at the end of the season.

James Braid Trophy

James Braid Trophy

 

The Millennium Trophy – first awarded in 2000

In order to celebrate the Millennium a beautiful crystal claret jug with silver mounts was donated to the Club by Ian Bayne. Ian had been a member of Dun Whinny for many years served on Council and was Captain from 1983 to 1985. The Trophy was donated for the Handicap Knockout competition. Qualifiers are selected from the Championship qualifying rounds and would be the 8 best net aggregate scores after selection of the scores for the Scratch Trophy. For a few years it became the custom for the past winner to donate a bottle of claret to the next recipient at the time the trophy was awarded. The knockout rounds for this trophy are generally played on the Queens course at the same time as the knockout rounds for the Scratch Trophy are being played on the Kings course.

Millennium Trophy

Millennium Trophy

 

The George McKelvie Trophy – first awarded in 2005

George McKelvie, a noted Consultant Surgeon, was a member of Dun Whinny for over 30 years during which time he served on Council and was Captain from 1987 to 1989. George was a keen golfer and serious competitor who railed against the Rules of Golf from time to time but was generally well liked by all the members. He took the function of being Captain seriously and under his guidance a number of changes were made to the running of the Club not least of which was the development of cyclical change to the Council by encouraging Council Members to stand down after two years thus allowing more members of the Club to become involved. His death is noted in the AGM minutes on 2005 along with a note of his bequest to the Club to purchase a trophy for a Better Ball Stroke Play Competition over the Queens Course from the front tees. Pairing were to be drawn among those members wishing to play and each partner was to receive an allowance of ¾ of full handicap. The bequest purchased a beautiful silver trophy which is a modern bowl shaped trophy mounted on a circular timber plinth with silver band. This was a bespoke design by Graham Stewart of Dublane a noted silversmith.

George McKelvie Trophy

George McKelvie Trophy

 

The Macfarlane Quaich – first awarded in 2009

From the early 1980’s there had been included in the fixture list a Seniors Medal. This prize was generally a voucher or small gift purchased annually by the Club but in 2009 a trophy was presented to the Club by Bob Macfarlane a past Captain of Dun Whinny. The trophy takes the form of a substantial sized Quaich and was previously a golf trophy for the Beazer Homes organisation for whom Bob was once the Chairman. The trophy was originally used for a Beazer Homes golf competition in 1997 and 1998 and carries an inscription to that effect. Bob was keen to make this presentation as this was the one event in the calendar for which there was no formal prize. The trophy is for the best net score from the medal tees of the Queens course and the winner has to be aged 55 years or older on the date of the competition.

MacFalane Quaich (Seniors Trophy)

MacFalane Quaich (Seniors Trophy)

 

WINTER COMPETITIONS

From about 1978 winter competitions were started and trophies were awarded for three winter competitions.

The Winter League Stroke Play – first awarded in 1978

The minutes relating to many of the winter trophies are not clear but during the winter members have an opportunity to submit medal cards from the forward tees of either Kings or Queens Courses. The Winter League Stroke Play Trophy is awarded to the member with the best aggregate of 4 cards during the winter season. Rules dictate that not more than one card per course per week may be submitted. The trophy was presented to Dun Whinny by Dr W Y Galloway in 1978 and it is interesting to note that he also was the first recipient of the trophy. Dr Galloway became the Captain of Dun Whinny at the AGM in 1981.

Winter Stroke Play

Winter Stroke Play

 

The Tom Brown Tankard – first awarded in 1978

The Tom Brown Tankard is a small tankard the source of which is not clear from the minutes of the Club. The Trophy is awarded for the best net score during the winter season on either the Kings or Queens Course. In the event that there is a tie then the score on the Kings course will be declared the winner.

Tom Brown Cup

Tom Brown Cup

 

Winter League Match Play Trophy – first awarded in 1978

The trophy was presented to Dun Whinny by James Morrison during his terms of office as Captain. The trophy is awarded to the winner of a Round Robin Match play competition over the winter months. In recent years the format of this competition has changed from single to fourball competition.

Winter Match Play Cup

Winter Match Play Cup

 

 

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